Transportation Solutions

As high gas prices, traffic congestion, strain on the state budget and concerns about pollution prompt widespread calls for change, PEC supports a new transportation vision for Virginia. 

Video: Building Bike and Pedestrian Connections in Charlottesville and Albemarle.

Video: Building Bike and Pedestrian Connections in Charlottesville and Albemarle.

The Piedmont Environmental Council is working with a diverse coalition of organizations and communities to envision and implement a comprehensive network of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure that is safe, inclusive, nature-full and useful for transportation in Charlottesville and Albemarle County.

Take Action: Help Save Metro and Other Public Transit!

Take Action: Help Save Metro and Other Public Transit!

empty metro car
Photo by M.V. Jantzen, Flickr.

Congress needs to pass a stimulus package with $32 billion in emergency operations funds for transit agencies across the country. Send a quick email to your Representative and Senators using this campaign set up by our colleagues at The Coalition for Smarter Growth.

Once we have widespread access to a COVID vaccine and our region fully re-opens, we need a transit system that works, for all who need it, when they need it. On top of that, more people staying at home during the pandemic has highlighted how much individual vehicles contribute to air pollution. A well-functioning Metro is critical for reducing those greenhouse gas emissions by giving people public transportation alternatives and reducing pressure to expand highways and sprawling development into rural areas.

This stimulus package funding would help cover the collapse in fare revenue, maintain service, prevent service disruption, and provide support for health safety measures that are currently under threat from WMATA’s expected $500 million budget shortfall for FY2022. 

Local comprehensive plans in places like Loudoun County depend on a functioning Metro system to balance development and conservation. Regional land use and transportation plans are built around reliable weekday, weeknight and weekend service. This is not just a local and regional priority either – it is essential infrastructure that makes it easier for people to work at or travel to the federal government and other important institutions.

And most of us either use Metro or have family, friends, employees, or community members who depend on the opportunities and service it offers. 

In short, we need to support Metro to protect our workforce, environment, and economy.


The following was an email alert sent out by our colleagues at the Coalition for Smarter Growth, which is a division of PEC that promotes walkable, inclusive, and transit-oriented communities in the Washington D.C. region.

Take action so we don’t lose decades of progress

Last week, WMATA released some very grim news regarding their upcoming fiscal year 2022 budget which begins July 1. If Congress cannot pass a stimulus package soon, we will lose decades of hard-fought progress on transit expansion and service improvements. Facing a $500 million budget shortfall, the proposed FY22 budget would:

  • End weekend rail service 
  • Cease rail service at 9pm daily
  • Close 19 Metro stations
  • Slash bus service

Our region relies on WMATA to transport essential workers, keep vehicle emissions low, and stimulate economic activity. These cuts, on top of those already proposed for January 1, threaten the progress made from decades of advocacy, but we’re not ready to give up.

Though this proposed budget is bleak, all hope is not lost. There is still time for Congress to pass a long overdue stimulus package with $32 billion in emergency operating funds for transit agencies nationwide. We’ve been pushing for this level of funding alongside many other transit advocacy groups since June.

The Senate has introduced a package with $15 billion for transit. While we appreciate our own Congressional delegation’s work on this, the allocation formula will provide nowhere near enough for WMATA to avoid severe cuts next year. 

Push your representatives to support the full $32 billion needed for transit to survive the pandemic

Even if politics limits the current deal to $15 billion, we’ll fight for the additional funds needed. We must fight for the emergency transit funding necessary to protect our workforce, environment, and economy but we can’t do it without your help. So take action today, and share on social media to spread the word!

Thanks for all you do,

Stewart Schwartz
Executive Director
Coalition for Smarter Growth
stewart@smartergrowth.net

P.S. If you represent an organization, we are circulating an organizational sign-on letter here.

Waterloo Bridge — Still Closed. Still Waiting for Repair

Waterloo Bridge — Still Closed. Still Waiting for Repair

The other night as I drove home, I paid attention to each bridge crossing. There were 18 concrete slab bridges. A majority of our roadways are repetitive monolithic creatures with little character or interest of their own. This reminded me of a statistic I once heard about how the drive to somewhere can be a valuable part of the tourist experience. Most people probably don’t travel out of their way to visit a historic bridge, but crossing one is a memorable part of the journey. And if you live near one, it probably is a part of what defines ‘home’ for you.

Waterloo Bridge Update — Dec 2014

Text from our Dec 2014 Member Newsletter:

PEC, Fauquier County, and Culpeper County commissioned a report that identified a more cost-effec­tive option for the full rehabilitation of the historic Waterloo Bridge on Waterloo Road (Route 613). The bridge has a long history dating back to the late nineteenth century, but it was closed due to safety concerns last winter. 

Waterloo Bridge Report

Waterloo Bridge Report

An encouraging new report commissioned by The Piedmont Environmental Council, Fauquier County, and Culpeper County has identified a more cost-effective option for the full rehabilitation of the historic Waterloo Bridge on Waterloo Road (Route 613). The bridge has a long history dating back to the late nineteenth century, but it was closed due to safety concerns last winter. 

Route 29 Improvements on Track in Charlottesville

In our last newsletter, we shared great news regarding the demise of the ill-conceived Western Bypass. As you might recall, a major blow to the project had been delivered back in February, when the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) announced serious reservations about the viability of the project. It made it clear that the necessary federal approvals were indoubt unless VDOT reevaluated the entire project, including a new review of alternatives.