Historic & Scenic Landscapes

The Piedmont’s beautiful vistas also present some of America’s most historic terrain-where visionaries, pioneers, farmers, generals, soldiers, slaves and Presidents lived and left their mark. 

The Piedmont Memorial Overlook

The Piedmont Memorial Overlook sits on 50 acres owned by The Piedmont Environmental Council, and is part of a corridor of the Blue Ridge Mountains that is permanently protected by Sky Meadows State Park, the G. Richard Thompson Wildlife Management Area, the Appalachian National Scenic Trail, and private land under conservation easement.

The Rapidan River-Clark Mountain Rural Historic District

 The Rapidan River-Clark Mountain Rural Historic District is a nearly 40,000 acre historic landscape in Orange County and parts of Madison and Culpeper Counties that has been determined eligible for listing on the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places for its high concentration of historic resources.

Driving in the Right Direction

Driving in the Right Direction

Finally, after a four-year battle to save the Route 613 Waterloo Bridge over the Rappahannock River, success is in sight. The bridge, which connects Fauquier and Culpeper counties, is a treasured historic resource for local residents and visitors to the region. Following its closure, there was a huge citizen response in support of rehabilitating the structure. Thousands of people have taken action. They have signed a petition, written emails, made phone calls, attended meetings, posted on Facebook and put up yard signs, all in support of saving Waterloo Bridge.

These Hills Were Home

These Hills Were Home

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A walking history guide to the Blue Ridge Mountains of Northern Greene and Western Madison County, Virginia. This new book, written by PEC’s Kristie Kendall, provides a historic context and trail guide for life in the mountains, from the first white settlers through the 1930s, when land was obtained for the creation of Shenandoah National Park.

Waterloo Bridge — Still Closed. Still Waiting for Repair

Waterloo Bridge — Still Closed. Still Waiting for Repair

The other night as I drove home, I paid attention to each bridge crossing. There were 18 concrete slab bridges. A majority of our roadways are repetitive monolithic creatures with little character or interest of their own. This reminded me of a statistic I once heard about how the drive to somewhere can be a valuable part of the tourist experience. Most people probably don’t travel out of their way to visit a historic bridge, but crossing one is a memorable part of the journey. And if you live near one, it probably is a part of what defines ‘home’ for you.

Comments Requesting Re-evaluation of Statewide Historic Bridge Inventory

Comments Requesting Re-evaluation of Statewide Historic Bridge Inventory

The Commonwealth’s historic bridges create a sense of place and a link to the past. These bridges – versus featureless concrete slabs – are community amenities. They provide not just the physical crossing of a stream or river, but an experience that connects people to both the road and the surrounding landscape. 

A small town with a lot to offer

A small town with a lot to offer

Creating a community park takes quite a bit of planning, which is why the historic railroad town of Remington is about to receive support for adding recreational space for its residents and visitors.

Situated on a scenic natural crossing of the Rappahannock River, Remington has an abundance of character and contains elements of a walkable community, including a compact street grid. But the town has few common areas for recreation and no official public access to the river.