Our Work

Safeguarding the landscapes, communities and heritage of the Piedmont by involving citizens in public policy and land conservation. Learn more about our work by browsing the subject areas below and find out how to get involved!

Video: Free Flow

Video: Free Flow

A must-watch!! We’re so excited to bring you this video about our largest trout stream restoration project to date, on Bolton Branch in Rappahannock County on the border of Shenandoah National Park.

Video: Restoring Access to the Rivanna River

Video: Restoring Access to the Rivanna River

To help the public safely access the Rivanna River, PEC teamed up with the City of Charlottesville Parks and Recreation, Rivanna Conservation Alliance, and Rivanna River Co, to update the boat landing at Riverview Park!

Rangel Communication Proposes 199-ft Tower in Thoroughfare Gap

Rangel Communication Proposes 199-ft Tower in Thoroughfare Gap

We have learned that Rangel Communication Inc. will be filing an application with Fauquier County for a 199-foot monopole tower and tower compound in Thoroughfare Gap, just east of the Broad Run Post Office along the south side of Rt. 55. This area, steeped in history, is the gateway into Fauquier County from Haymarket to the east.

Cycling for Sustainable Cities

Cycling for Sustainable Cities

Join PEC and partners on May 7, 2021 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm for Cycling for Sustainable Cities: A Presentation + Discussion with Ralph Buehler & John Pucher.

Celebrate Bike Month (May, 2021) with some inspiring stories about how to make cycling safer for everyone! Researchers Ralph Buehler & John Pucher will talk about their new book, Cycling for Sustainable Cities (Island Press), which describes ways to make city cycling safe, practical, and convenient for all ages and abilities. They will include trends and policies, and share examples from across America and around the world–with cases similar to our own communities.

Find out more and register!

A Community Forest Grows (and Expands) on the Edge of Charlottesville

A Community Forest Grows (and Expands) on the Edge of Charlottesville

Since the advent of Covid-19, Charlottesville area greenways and open spaces have seen unprecedented visitorship as people have gravitated to the outdoors in search of the physical and emotional benefits of nature and fresh air. That’s why the creation of the new Heyward Community Forest is so timely.

Two Years, Two Acquisitions and a Multigenerational Legacy:

In 2019, the Piedmont Environmental Council (PEC) and the Virginia Department of Forestry helped the City of Charlottesville acquire 142 acres adjacent to the Ragged Mountain Natural Area through a United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Community Forest Program grant of $562,500 to purchase the land. The city contributed $37,500 to bring the total purchase price to $600,000. The owner, Louisa Heyward, agreed to donate the remaining value.