Wavyleaf Basketgrass in Virginia

News and Resources

Events, photos, and in-depth studies and accounts of eradication efforts in our area.

A report just out from APHIS/USDA has new answers to questions concerning morphology, dispersal, potential for invasiveness, and reproduction of Wavyleaf Basketgrass. View the USDA's report>>

 

Friday, February 03, 2012

 
Asiatic Wavyleaf Basketgrass, Oplismenus hirtellus undulatifolius
Habitat Conservation
Wildlife and Heritage Service
 
 
We, Alan Ford This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 703.732.5291, Virginia Native Plant Society, and Marc Imlay, Conservation biologist, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 301-283-0808h, 301-442-5657c Maryland Native Plant Society, on behalf of the organizations and their members listed below, request $5-10 million funding to detect and treat Asiatic Wavyleaf Basketgrass, Oplismenus hirtellus undulatifolius in Maryland and Virginia. The only hope we have to save 10% of the natural environment in 1/4th of the United States is emergency federal, state and county legislation and non-profit funding. It is spreading very rapidly this year and covers all our woodland habitats like astroturf, killing all the other herbaceous plants. It is far worse than Japanese Stiltgrass which already is a monoculture over 10% of the national parks in this region. It forms a dense carpet of hundreds of acres after 5-10 years if not controlled. So far it is only in Maryland and Virginia so we still have a chance to contain it.  
 
The funds could be administered by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, State of Virginia, and U. S. Department of the Interior for detection and removal of Wavyleaf Basketgrass by Federal, State and County agencies and on private lands such as Piedmont Environmental Council and The Nature Conservancy at the known sites and other sites in Maryland and Virginia. 
 
We request that a portion of this funding be included in the current Virginia, Maryland and Federal omnibus spending packages. We request additional funding be included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The next stimulus package is a good option since the proposal is ready to go for work starting in April each year.  Please contact Alan Ford This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 703.732.5291, Virginia Native Plant Society, and Marc Imlay, Conservation biologist, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 301-283-0808h, 301-442-5657c Maryland Native Plant Society for more information,
 
 
Adkins Arboretum
Anacostia Watershed Society
Ancestral Knowledge
Appalachian Cherokee Nation
Chesapeake Natives, Inc
Community & Environmental Defense Services
Earth Charter
Earth Sangha
Friends of Lower Beaverdam Creek
Friends of Patapsco Valley & Heritage Greenway
Herring Run Watershed Association
Invasive Plant Control Inc
Maryland Academy of Science
Maryland Alliance for Greenway Improvement and Conservation (MAGIC)
Maryland Chapter of the Sierra Club.
Maryland Conservation Council, Inc. 
Maryland Native Plant Society 
Mid-Atlantic Invasive Plant Council, 
Patuxent Riverkeeper
Piedmont Environmental Council
Reston Association
Southern Maryland Audubon Society, Inc
Straughan Environmental Services, Inc.
Virginia Native Plant Society
Washington Quaker Workcamps

Maryland has become ground zero for a new invasive species threat, wavyleaf basketgrass

Asian plant's sticky, podlike seeds are being unwittingly spread by hikers and pets.
October 22, 2011: The Baltimore Sun

What Triggers Mass Extinctions? Study Shows How Invasive Species Stop New Life

December 2010: Article from Science Daily

Potential Origin of Prospective Federal Noxious Weed Identified

2009 Annual Report: Center for Plant Health Science and Technology (CPHST)
CPHST Fort Collins and cooperators at the University of Alabama in Huntsville recently developed a molecular genotyping method to help establish the identity of wavy leaf basket grass (WLBG, Oplismenus hirtellus ssp. undulatifolius), a shade tolerant grass that was recently discovered invading the forest understory in Maryland and aggressively spreading to the state of Virginia. In collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution to search for the origin of WLBG in the U.S., we found that Oplismenus undulatifolius from Caucasus Mountains in Russia (Krasnodarskiy region) was a genetic match to the U.S. invasive WLBG. We will now begin genotyping specimens from China to determine if these are also potential source populations. For questions, please contact Sharon Talley at 970-490-4463.

DOF Forest Health Review

November 2009: Department of Forestry (The section on wavyleaf basketgrass begins on page 11) 

Wavyleaf Basket Grass, an Invasive Exotic, Found in Virginia

November 2009: Virginia Forests, a blog of the Division of Resources Information, Virginia Department of Forestry. 

A New Virginia Invader: Wavyleaf Basketgrass

May 2009: Virginia Master Naturalist Program 

Virginia Flora Project News

2008: Project News from the Flora Project of Virginia

Read, download, and print! Discover more in-depth information on wavyleaf basketgrass and help spread the word to your neighbors about this invasive.

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