Clean Water

Conserving Water

By reducing impervious surface.

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Land conservation and land use planning/advocacy are the primary ways that PEC works to reduce impervious surfaces.
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Improving Water Quality

Through land management.

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From rural to suburban to urban, there are best management practices (native plantings, livestock fencing) that make water cleaner.
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Restoring Connections

By removingĀ barriers.

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Culverts, low-water crossings and linear infrastructure (i.e. pipelines, highways) can serve as disruptions to healthy stream flow.
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Measuring Success

Through stream monitoring.

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Monitoring water quality, biological populations, and physical features of stream habitat are all vital to understanding stream health.
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Goose Creek is a state-designated Scenic River whose watershed in Loudoun and Fauquier counties is a rich and varied landscape of rolling countryside with farms, forests and historic sites. Soils well suited to agriculture and a network of fresh spring water and streams have made this some of the most productive farming country in the United States. Goose Creek also provides drinking water to our neighbors in the City of Fairfax and the rapidly growing suburbs of Loudoun County.

Water quality surveys performed in the early 1990's showed it to be one of the cleanest waterways on the Atlantic seaboard. Over the past decade, scientists studying the creek have found a rare biological community and new species of aquatic life within the banks. Additionally, the forested riparian areas and farm fence hedgerows of the watershed provide natural habitat and essential corridors for wildlife. The mature tree canopies contribute to water and air temperature reduction in summer and improved air quality for the region.

This special resource, however, is under great threat. The watershed of Goose Creek encompasses one-third of Loudoun County, the second fastest growing county in the nation, and nearly one-quarter of Fauquier County, which is facing increasing development pressure. The state of Virginia has identified the North Fork of Goose Creek as a high-priority area for non-point-source pollution and Lower Goose Creek as an impaired waterway. This diverse watershed is an invaluable natural resource at high risk.

The Fund is named in memory of former PEC Board member James M. Rowley. Mr. Rowley sought out Loudoun County in 1953 as the perfect location to begin a life of farming. His constant concern for the land, diligent efforts to prevent erosion, control runoff, distribute and plant trees, eradicate invasive plants and maintain viable farm land evolved into community and legislative efforts to protect sustainable agriculture in a manner sensitive to the environment and sensible to landowners.

For more information, contact Kristie Kendall at 540-347-2334 ext.29, or at kkendall[at]pecva.org or support the James M. Rowley Goose Creek Fund with an Online Donation.

 
 
 

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