The Piedmont View

Fall 2016 Piedmont View

The 2016 fall edition of the Piedmont View features a story on the fencing project at Roundabout Meadows, a grant to preserve history at Jack's Shop and James City, our donation of property to Shenandoah National Park, a welcome to PEC's new Director of Development Nan Moring, and more. You can read individual articles online or view a PDF for the entire issue.

Polluted water is not only bad for us and the environment, but it’s bad for livestock as well,” says Celia Vuocolo, habitat and stewardship specialist at PEC.

A significant stewardship project is wrapping up this fall at Roundabout Meadows, the 141- acre property near Gilbert’s Corner that was gifted to PEC in 2013. The project is focused on implementing agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) that will keep livestock away from the property’s streams and provide a clean source of water for cattle. As part of the effort, over 2 miles of fencing and almost a mile of pipeline plumbing for a watering system have been installed.

“Our long-term plan for Roundabout Meadows is to retain its agricultural use, and we want to do so in a manner that is in harmony with being good stewards of the land and water resources, while farming continues on the property,” says Michael Kane, director of conservation at PEC.

PEC received a grant of $35,300 from the National Park Service’s American Battlefield Protection Program to research the history of two previously undocumented Civil War battles that occurred at Jack’s Shop and James City in Madison County, Va.

Creating a community park takes quite a bit of planning, which is why the historic railroad town of Remington is about to receive support for adding recreational space for its residents and visitors.

Situated on a scenic natural crossing of the Rappahannock River, Remington has an abundance of character and contains elements of a walkable community, including a compact street grid. But the town has few common areas for recreation and no official public access to the river.

Shenandoah National Park just grew a little bigger and a little more beautiful. This past May, We donated a 17.2-acre property of ours in Rappahannock County to the National Park Service. A forested and vacant parcel on a mountain slope south of Sperryville, Virginia, the land is within the legislative boundary of Shenandoah National Park.

“The property is surrounded by the park on three of its four sides, so it’s a key puzzle piece,” says Carolyn Sedgwick, PEC’s Rappahannock County land conservation officer, who oversaw the donation from PEC to the National Park Service. “This great public-private partnership with the National Park Service has resulted in the expansion of one of the most important wildlife corridors on the east coast.”

The donated acreage is by an area in the national park designated as federal wilderness — the highest conservation designation for federal land — making it an important and strategic area to conserve.

Please join us in welcoming Nan Moring, who joined our staff this past July! Working in fundraising for over 21 years, Nan has extensive experience with nonprofits in major gifts, planned giving, public relations, and special events. She also served as a Captain in the United States Air Force

Boasting 116 alumni since its inception, the seven-week Fellowship Program has helped future environmental leaders gain hands-on experience in a unique mix of topics such as land conservation, land use, sustainable agriculture, energy policy, habitat stewardship, historic preservation, transportation planning and geographic information systems (GIS) with experienced professionals.

We receive applicants from all over the country. Through a selective process, twelve college students are chosen to participate in the summer Program.

Do you own land along a stream? If so, then you may be interested in the Headwater Stream Initiative, a joint project from PEC and Friends of the Rappahannock (FOR). The initiative provides free technical assistance, project design, materials, and labor for the planting of native trees and shrubs in riparian zones in the Upper Rappahannock River Watershed, which includes Culpeper, Fauquier, Greene, Madison, Orange and Rappahannock Counties.

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