Transmission Lines

Transmission Lines

The Piedmont Environmental Council has some experience dealing with Dominion and transmission line proposals through our region. In 2006 and 2008, utilities proposed two unnecessary high-voltage transmission lines that would connect to the oldest and dirtiest coal-fired generation in the United States. Learn more about the TrAIL line (approved and built) and the PATH line (turned down). More recently, a series of projects has been proposed, each with its own set of details and impacts. 

  • New Transmission Line Proposed Through Culpeper, Madison and Orange Counties

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    Dominion, in coordination with First Energy, is proposing a new 230-kV transmission line. Depending on the route selected, the line would run for 13.2 – 18.5 miles, connecting the Pratts substation in Madison County to an existing line that runs between the Gordonsville and Remington substations.

     

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  • Coal-By-Wire Transmission Line: DEFEATED

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    PEC has Great News!

    For six years, the Potomac Appalachian Transmission Highline (PATH)—a massive, unnecessary 765-kV transmission line— has threatened Virginia. The line was to start in southwest West Virginia, travel northeast through previously undisturbed land, eventually cross through Virginia’s northern Piedmont, and wind up near Frederick, Maryland. PEC and our allies have been fighting this wasteful project for years, and we have some good news

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  • Higher Power

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    Can we save the climate without building new energy infrastructure on conservation lands across America? PEC answers yes--in this article for the Fall 2009 Land Trust Alliance magazine.

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  • PEC Testifies to Congress on Transmission Policy

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    PEC President Chris Miller was one of twelve experts from across the country summoned to testify before a House of Representatives subcommittee at a June 12 hearing entitled "The Future of the Grid: Proposals for Reforming National Transmission Policy."

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Transmission

The Piedmont Environmental Council has some experience dealing with Dominion and transmission line proposals through our region. In 2006 and 2008, utilities proposed two unnecessary high-voltage transmission lines that would connect to the oldest and dirtiest coal-fired generation in the United States. Learn more about the TrAIL line (approved and built) and the PATH line (turned down). More recently, a series of projects has been proposed, each with its own set of details and impacts.

Read the full testimony before Congress

PEC President Chris Miller was one of twelve experts from across the country summoned to testify before a House of Representatives subcommittee at a June 12 hearing entitled "The Future of the Grid: Proposals for Reforming National Transmission Policy."

Backers of a "new national grid" are urging the federal government to push through thousands of miles of new major transmission lines, which some claim are needed to link population centers to wind and solar generation in the interior of the country.

Mr. Miller cautioned against a transmission-dominated approach to energy planning, making the following points:

  • Renewable generation need not be located far from the demand.
  • Off-shore wind, distributed solar, geothermal and other forms of renewable generation could be located near the load, reducing the need for long-distance transmission.
  • Transmission lines promoted as "green" could carry coal power.

TrAIL Line Information

TrAIL is a 500-kV transmission line that was proposed by Dominion and Allegheny Power in 2007 and approved to be built in 2008. The line runs from southwest Pennsylvania, through West Virginia, ultimately terminating in Loudoun County, Virginia.

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PATH Line Information

The PATH 765-kV transmission line was a partnership between American Electric Power and Allegheny Power. The line would have started near the Amos coal plant in West Virginia, traveling northeast through parts of Maryland and Virginia.

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