Clean Air & Water

Water flows through all of our land. To keep it plentiful and safe for drinking, swimming and fishing, we need clean air, expansive forests, responsible farms, wooded stream banks, and communities and individuals who make choices to avoid pollution.

From the Piedmont View

The following articles appeared in PEC's Membership Newsletter -- The Piedmont View

Grazing Along

Jun 06, 2016
A large herd of fluffy, yet still intimidating, sheep run full speed through a gate as they’re rotated to an alternate pasture at Over Jordan Farm in Flint Hill, Va. “I don’t use herding dogs. The…

Good News for the Brook Trout

Mar 18, 2016
We’re continuing our efforts to increase the habitat available to the eastern brook trout and other fish species with two pilot culvert removal projects...

A Day to Graze

Oct 20, 2015
At a recent pasture management field day, over 25 farmers, landowners and service providers toured Over Jordan Farm in Rappahannock County with Bean Hollow Grassfed owner Michael Sands. Sands gave…

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Grant

Dec 12, 2014
The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation awarded PEC a $200,000 grant from the Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund this past October. With this grant, PEC will collaborate with Loudoun County, the Town…

Riparian buffers are the single most effective means of protecting water resources. Streams guarded by a healthy forested riparian buffer run far cleaner and cooler and are more stable than a stream without any kind of buffer.

Learn more about the history, ecology, and beauty of the Shenandoah by watching "Shenandoah: Voices of the River", a 52-minute documentary produced by the Downstream Project.

 The Downstream Project is a non-profit organization founded to inspire individuals and groups to initiate solutions to ecological issues that threaten their communities. Their mission is to "promote natural resource conservation by stimulating awareness, action and alliances through visual arts and technology."

In early 2002, the Center for Watershed Protection, Goose Creek Association and the Piedmont Environmental Council embarked on a three-phase project to study the Goose Creek Watershed.

Goose Creek is a state-designated Scenic River whose watershed in Loudoun and Fauquier counties is a rich and varied landscape of rolling countryside with farms, forests and historic sites. Soils well suited to agriculture and a network of fresh spring water and streams have made this some of the most productive farming country in the United States. Goose Creek also provides drinking water to our neighbors in the City of Fairfax and the rapidly growing suburbs of Loudoun County.

The Cedar Run watershed incorporates a substantial portion of Fauquier County and central Prince William County. The watershed comprises nearly one-quarter of the total land area of Fauquier County and has historically supported agriculture in the form of family farms. The watershed possesses many elements valuable to conservation

Loudoun's Clean Stream Coalition

The following articles were posted by Loudoun's Clean Stream Coalition

  • Curious About the Streams Near You?

    Check out this great interactive map and find out more about your local stream conditions in Loudoun! Read More
  • History of the Chesapeake Bay Act in Virginia

    The Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act (“the Bay Act”) was originally adopted by the Virginia General Assembly in 1988, taking effect in 84 localities, including suburban and urban communities like Fairfax, Alexandria and Richmond, and rural counties like Caroline, King William and Chesterfield. The General Assembly of Virginia passed the Bay Act in an effort to promote “the general welfare of the people of the Commonwealth” (section 10.1-2100) by protecting the Chesapeake Bay, its tributaries (i.e. all bodies of water that ultimately flow to the Bay and thus constitute the Bay’s watershed), and other state waters. [i] Read More
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    Can a Horse Farm Improve Our Streams?

    Some citizens in the Commonwealth have been able to put into place innovative practices to protect the local streams from polluted runoff. This article is about how the Prince William Soil and Water Conservation District, together with Oakwood Farm, have developed a cooperative model “Chesapeake Bay-Friendly Horse Farm”. Read More

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